Oregon gets salty while Portland goes without.

Oregon gets salty while Portland goes without.

Given the amount of rain Portland sees each year (average rainfall is 36.69 inches), you’d be forgiven in thinking that the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) would have a plan in place for when more solid stuff falls from the skies (think: snow).

For years, ODOT refused to use salt to clear roads in any circumstance, pointing to potential damage to the environment as the reason to avoid putting down the slippery-reducing substance (despite the environmental damage inevitably caused from dozens of car accidents leaking oil, transmission fluid, gasoline, and a number of other chemicals).

The catastrophes resulting from little to no snow removal have nearly made Portland a national punchline for its residents’ inability to handle the winter weather. Just check out this YouTube video made of some of the insane driving from the Great Snowstorm of 2007.

Well, that’s now changed. Sort of.

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The Cellphone Ban: Unenforced Laws are just Good Ideas

The Cellphone Ban: Unenforced Laws are just Good Ideas

Bicyclists are legally required to come to a complete stop at stop signs. Skateboarders are not permitted outside of skate parks within Portland’s city limits. Oregon drivers are not allowed to use their cellphones while driving. Laws that aren’t enforced aren’t laws, they’re just suggestions.

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Replace the I-5 bridge with some kind of catapult system.

Replace the I-5 bridge with some kind of catapult system.

Interstate 5 (I-5, as it’s more commonly known) could quite possibly be the most important interstate on the west coast. The freeway links Baja California with British Columbia; seriously, it cuts all the way through the United States.

Considering how the majority of goods are still transported by trucks, you might think that any bridge that’s a part of this interstate would be extremely high-tech, and that the replacement of said bridge would be expedited quickly and efficiently.

Welcome to Portland, where what’s quite possibly one of the most important commercial bridges in the world crosses the waterborne border of two states: Oregon and Washington. Let the problems begin!

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